We were brought onto the submittal team as retail consultants, but hired by the client as the prime architect. The aesthetic identity of the store was based on the focus of the museum, Science and Industry, and was built loosely around the character of Dr. Ismo in the form of a laboratory space. A grid of fabricated steel columns and electrical raceways organized the store into departments, with large-scale gears and pulleys in the ceiling forming a soffit over and identifying clearly the location of the sales desk.  
  The Dr. Ismo storyline created a number of opportunities for unusual displays, including a truck deliving new materials (featured products), and the dozens of packing crates which formed the bases for all of the display fixtures and science demonstration areas. Signage was suspended from functional clothes lines on pulleys between each of the steel columns, with low-voltage task lighting spanning along the same grid lines. Wetzel assembled all of the fixtures in Seattle and transported them to Portland.  
   
Ray C. Freeman III
Ray C. Freeman III
Registered Architect
rayiii@workshop3d.com
(206) 349-3147

Residential
Residential

Commercial
Retail

Office
Office

Miscellany
Miscellany

Marvin L. Wetzel
Licensed Contractor
mlwgc1@gmail.com
(206) 271-4418
Marvin Wetzel